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the most expensive election of all time. >> we're here on the campus of ucla law school where they debate constitutional issues. today they're doing a convention on money out and voters in. >> and we have our elbow of the day later. jr jackson is going to love this. tweet us at tyt on current if you can guess who it is. zisko>>>el granada is a special place to learn because we have a dedicated community and a dedicated staff. and when kids come on campus everyday, they're enthusiasm for learning shines. we receive federal funding because a majority of our students are socially disadvantaged. making sure our students receive healthy nutritious lunches and breakfasts is critical to their learning. i would like to see students take more ownership of what they eat everyday and learn about their bodies and how their food nourishes them. sandra jonaidi>>> i hope that we get them early enough that they've learn some good eating habits and they go forward and become very productive humans and grow up to make us all proud of them. narrator>> for more info, go to curren
of ucla law school where they argue constitution. today they're discussing money out, voters in. >> and jayar jackson will love this. tweet us on @tytoncurrent if you can guess who it is. before the cold & flu season help prevent with lysol. because when you have 10 times more protection with each hand wash... and kill 99.9% of germs around the house with each spray... those healthy habits start to add up. this season, a good offense is the best defense and lysol has your family covered because that's our mission for health. >> it's no secret to regular viewers of this show that cenk has long been passionate, unbelievably passionate about campaign finance reform. this past weekend at ucla law school, he was invited to participate in a conference called money out voters in. let's take a look at how that worked out. >> cenk: we're here on the campus of ucla law school. where they debate constitutional issues. today they're doing a convention on money out voters in. the issue of getting money out of politics. they'll be discussing the pr
? >> it would be much larger constituency about creating that device. >> beyond that, law enforcement has other techniques. they do not need a special device. there is still reckless driving on the books, the power of the nation -- of observation and other evidence that can be relied upon. the same outcome to restrict -- >> can odor be introduced as evidence? rex the officers perception of an odor can. some potential evidence. >> talking about regulating the illegal drugs, they mentioned that 80% of the position painkillers in the world are sold in the united states. five percent of the population of the world's 80% of the world's painkillers. drug related overdoses for death -- close to 70% were from prescription drugs. even the drugs that we regulate -- we do not seem to be doing too good of a drug -- of a job at a lot of people are dying to reque. >> we would not have any car fatalities if there were no cars. i do not need to make light of what you're saying but the fact that failure of the peace and not condemn the value that exists for these other off -- these other. this brings up a large
with supreme court justice anthony kennedy. and then yale law professor talks about how president obama stance on same-sex marriage. this week on "newsmakers, "president of the service employees international union talks about what unions like the seiu are looking for in budget negotiations. can see "newsmakers" at 10:00 a.m. >> what about if the soviet union announces tomorrow but if we attack cuba, it is going to be nuclear war? >> serious things here, we're .oing to be uneasy p >> something may make these people should off. -- shoot it off. i would want to make my own people very alert. >> it is a fascinating moment. it is amazing that eisenhower tells him to have a people alert. of course people are alert. kennedy laps. then he says, -- laughs. then he says, hang on tight. they're able to joke a little bit with each other. especially during this crisis, the had a sense of how lonely it is to occupy that office and i were getting all kinds of a device, good advice, a lot of faulty advice, which kennedy was. eisenhower knew all about faulty military advice. he is able to speak with supreme a
for 35 years. he was the president back then, too, of the harvard law review. we had -- we are used to holding the reins of power. a chief justice also holds the reins of power. the only difference is that a chief justice must hold them lightly, lest he discovered they are not allowed the -- attached to anything. nevertheless, i know some long and personal experience that david brings to rice, a special vision, telecom and leadership. this school is fortunate to have him at the helm, and i know he feels blessed to be here. i am pleased that they invited me to visit rice as part of the centennial celebration of the university's foundation, and i extend my sincere congratulations to the trustees, the faculty, students, and alumni on your first great century. the founding of a new university is always an historic occasion, but the founding ceremony for rice was truly extraordinary. i went back to read the newspaper accounts from october, 1912, that recorded the event. the papers reported that the distinguished first president of rice invited 150 pronounced scholars from around the worl
nude, of course. but the new law says are they telling people they should be ashamed of living in the city, and is that wrong? >> they are basically telling people they should be ashamed to be naked in our city. that's totally wrong. >> they couldn't find somebody who didn't have white powder all over? >> speaking of being agitated -- >> very nice. >> wedding rings have a similar affect. >> has the dream come to a tragic end? >> i think so. although i am for the band. if it is legal what is the fun in taking it out on the train? >> you don't mean getting angry. >> i mean throwing my arms up and going huh? >> and then hearing the laughter and sobbing? >> i keep my arms like that until everybody leaves. >> andrew, the new law has exemptions for people at fairs, parades and the beta breakers street run. so they are going to have their fair share of nudity. >> this is part of a vast left wing conspiracy. first we have feminists talking about vaginas. remember when gays were wicked and sort of -- it was a little forbidden and they are funny. now it is like, who cares? the only thing
's supporters are calling for a million man demonstration. >>> and a maryland law vofrg the collection of dan evidence goes before the u.s. supreme court in february. it could impact the entire country in many ways. our legal guys are weighing in. and u.s. companies are starting to rethink their off shore manufacturing strategy. we'll find out why one ceo decided to bring jobs back to the u.s. [ male announcer ] this is joe woods' first day of work. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ gordon ] for some this line is a convenience. how you doing today? i'm good thanks. how are you? i'm good. [ gordon ] but for others, it's all they can afford. every day nearly nine million old
go to jail. >> have you named anybody who could go to jail for breaking the law with the pacs? >> not a person. >> that's my kind of law. smiles make more smiles. when the chocolate is hershey's. life is delicious. [ male announcer ] you like who you are... and you learned something along the way. this is the age of knowing what you're made of. so, why let erectile dysfunction get in your way? talk to your doctor about viagra. 20 million men already have. ask if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take viagra if you take nitrates for chest pain; it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. side effects include headache, flushing upset stomach, and abnormal vision. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. stop taking viagra and call your doctor right away if you experience a sudden decrease or loss in vision or hearing. this is the age of taking action. viagra. talk to your doctor. see if america's most prescribed ed treatment i
. military, intelligence, diplomatic, law enforcement, economic, and above all, the power of our values as americans. i kinda has sought to operate in areas beyond the reach of affective security and governance -- al qaeda has sought to operate in areas beyond the reach of the effective security in governance. they are now seeking to take a vantage of the transition to gain new sanctuary and incite violence. know that al qaeda and its affiliates are looking to establish a foothold in other countries in the middle east and africa, including the group in nigeria. the international community and our regional partners share our alcern about molali, where qaeda affiliated groups have taken hold in the north. we are also concerned about libya. with respect to the attack, let me be clear. we will work with the libyan government to bring to justice those who perpetrated the attacks. to protect americans at home and overseas, we need to continue to pursue al qaeda wherever they seek to hide. we must be constantly vigilant. we must be constantly determined to pursue this enemy, but what will it t
present member dhaka by law. it's a great pleasure to be reviewed. i feel so happy. thank you for your hospitality. this is my first visit as the president-elect of mexico, and i also want to congratulate you for your victory last november 6th for your second term as president to the united states and we wish you great success. i know you have a great task before you but i trust that you will be doing a wonderful job and i also want to thank you, president obama for having the vice president joe biden were go to mexico for the inaugural ceremony next saturday december 1st. i feel so pleased to be able to have the vice president biden represent you in mexico, and of course we are waiting for you in the delegation. >> [speaking in native tongue] the >> this is an opportunity we only have every 12 years. you will be starting your next four year term. i will be starting a six year administration in mexico as you know and i think this is a great opportunity for all of us to have a closer link of brotherhood and sisterhood and collaboration and of course of great accomplishments we might hav
for the president's health care law to be part of the fiscal talks. the white house told the "huffington post" the president opposes that. joining me now from washington, nbc white house correspondent kristen welker and neil irwin. welcome to both of you. happy holiday. >> happy holidays, alex. >> kristen, politico said the negotiations are off to a rough start. what do you see as the likelihood of a deal before the end of the year? >> alex, i think they are off to a relatively rough start. president obama expected to invite congressional leaders back to the white house next week after the holiday, but it seems at this point aides are trying to hammer out the beginnings of the deal. republicans seem to be digging in their heels on the issue of taxes, saying they don't want to see the bush era tax cuts expire for the wealthiest americans. of course, that is something the democrats have been adamant about. so they're stuck on this old issue of taxes. and also stuck on the issue of entitlements. we had harry reid come out and basically say he wasn't open to reforming especially social security.
who makes the laws. caller: president obama could not put anything in there before his term going out. i have been following this for years. usually the incoming president has bills that the previous president left. on this president's way out, congress would not let him put any deals in. they put enough in there to finish his term. host: the president has been reelected and will be back in next year. but i appreciate the call. i want to point to an obituary in the new york times today on the death of warren redmon. he dies at age 82. the sometimes combative centrist republican senator from new hampshire. you will be seeing those obituaries in several papers today. coming up next, a top supreme court reporter david savage will join us to talk about some of that the-profile cases an accord will be taking up. and later, phyllis bennis will take a closer look at where u.s. troops are deployed around the world, and not just in the middle east. first, turning back to warren rudman. he was a moderate republican senator from new hampshire. he was 82 years old when he died. he sat down with c
. >>> on december 19, 2011, benjamin gupta, a law and mba student at george washington university died suddenly. mysteriously. he's no relationship to me, but when his family got word, they spent hours trading phone calls. they were in stunned disbelief. >> there was a message from his mom, and she had left three messages for me so i knew there was something wrong. >> i received a call from my mom. i didn't answer but then i got a text message from her, which is very unusual. >> and i called her back. and i said, what happened? and she says, it's ben. he died. i just didn't have any of the information. >> i finally said, how did this happen? and she said he went to sleep the night before and he just never woke up. >> he's always smiling, every picture he's smiling. >> for day ben gupta's family was desperate for answers. what killed him? he was only 28 years old. he had recently been given a clean bill of health. how could he just not wake up? >> and then the thought went through my mind that maybe it was some sort of a brain aneurism or something must have happened. >> but his father was in fo
bazell, nbc news, new york. >>> up next here tonight, the actual research about getting along with the in-laws. >>> veteran new yorkers didn't know what they were looking at last night. a lot of them were worried someone had gone and tarted up the dignified empire state building. it was the first display of a new array of lights at the very top of what is still the grand master of the new york skyline. last night's show was coordinated to an alicia keys song. the owners of the building say they'll use the new led lights to display various light patterns from now on. we'll be watching. >>> one of the most influential figures in american sports has died. marvin miller never played major league baseball, but he changed the game nonetheless. when he took the job as leader of the major league players union in 66, the minimum salary back then was $6,000, and the owners had all the power. by 1982, when he retired, the union was one of the strongest in the u.s. the average player's salary was almost a quarter million dollars. the players had won free agency. he was by any standard a game changer. marv
-five minutes chief justice john roberts and the supreme court and constitutional law. after that, part of our coverage of the halifax international security forum, including a look at the u.s. role in global politics and the situation in syria. several live events tell you about tomorrow morning. former florida governor jeb bush will be speaking at the foundation for excellence in education. you can once that event here on c-span2 at 845 eastern. just after that at 9:00 a.m. eastern on c-span three the foreign policy initiative begins a daylong symposium on foreign policy. such a look at congress, national security was arizona senator john kyl. then on c-span, a forum on energy policy hosted by the bipartisan policy center. former senators and byron dorgan. that is at 10:00 a.m. eastern. >> on 16 of 17 bases in the united states we have military-run schools. the average cost to educate a child in that school per year is $50,000. almost four times what the rest of public education costs. and the vast majority of our bases use public schools. we could take the money we're spending today, pay ev
. >> have you named anybody who could go to jail for breaking the law with the uh, i'm in a timeout because apparently riding the dog like it's a small horse is frowned upon in this establishment! luckily though, ya know, i conceal this bad boy underneath my blanket just so i can get on e-trade. check my investment portfolio, research stocks... wait, why are you taking... oh, i see...solitary. just a man and his thoughts. and a smartphone... with an e-trade app. ♪ nobody knows... ♪ [ male announcer ] e-trade. investing unleashed. >> michael: we learned today thanksgiving is a time of slow news time. so the news delivered today representative jesse jackson jr. who has long been suffering with bipolar disorder under treatment at the mayo clinic, will, in fact resign his seat. the seat that he won a few weeks ago. the rumors are that his brother or sister may be named in a deal to take that seat. those are just rumors. we'll follow the story and we'll let you know more about it with further political reporting next week. we do want to turn to another side of politics. we showed you on
because i went to law school, i went to stanford specifically to study the first amendment. it's been a passion of mine my entire life. i believe it is in part i had a russian father and a british mother and i came from that background realizing that the rule had to be that everybody got to say what they wanted to under the circumstances. the idea that, like, the government could understand what you said so it would be my mom or my dad in charge. in the general society free-speech said be the rule coming and i've always believed that. and so the history of the first amendment law we every class stanford offered indicted six additional credits of my own design on the history of the freedom of speech and despite all of that, i was utterly unprepared for the kind of cases i would see on the college campuses. utterly unprepared. and to dhaka little bit about this this is one of the reasons i wrote the book because it feels like banging my head against bill wall i'd been writing articles about this for my entire career, and i started getting people coming back to me saying well, okay, sure
left a law practice about eight years ago to work in education. i didn't consider whether i would work for a for-profit or nonprofit. i thought i want to go someplace and make a difference. i want to be a part of the solution. i took a pay cut to do that. people at learn it, i hard to hear quotes like that immediately for-profit is only stakeholder is the vest are tore or stockholder. for us at learn it we talk about we two bottom lines. we have an academic bottom line and financial bottom line and we can't fail on either. so we're very focused on student achievement and focused on making sure we're meeting the needs of those stakeholders which are the students, the families, the schools, the principals that we serve. so unfortunately i can't answer that exact question but i have to tell you we're here in this business because we want to make a difference and we're passionate about education. >> michael? to the point raquel just made, a skeptic of for-profits being involved in education, might say, well that is nice, if your heart is in the right place, okay but at the end of the day,
for an hour with students about the supreme court and constitutional law. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you, and thank you, david, for that gracious introduction, and all of you for a very, very warm welcome. this is my first visit to rice, and i'm already glad that i came. president lee told you i can't talk about anything current, future, or past. [laughter] my remarks will be brief. [laughter] i had the pleasure of knowing david for 35 years. as he mentioned, he was the president back then too of the harvard law review. he's used to holding the reigns of power. a chief justice also holds the reigns of power. the only difference is that a chief justice has to hold them lightly, less he discover they are not attached to anything. [laughter] perhaps a faculty feels the same way about a university president. [laughter] nevertheless, i know from long and personal experience that david brings to light a special vision, talent, and leadership. this school is fortunate to have him at the helm, and i know he feels blessed to be there. i'm especially pleased that david invited me to vis
that i'll be honest, it's, i know the law and i know the rights and i've done everything in accordance to the law for that reason, for my own protection. but it is something that i do. i'm a little worried about. but, you know, the importance of what we're seeing is so important that i feel like risks have to be made. i have to do this. and i'm sorry, what was the other question? >> where does this go from here? obviously, it's been something the labor movement and workers inside stores and a whole bunch of people have been trying to build worker power inside walmart for a long time. and walmart has been very clever and deft at avoiding any kind of concentrated labor power. and i wonder what you see as the next step. >> well, just from the success of our actions yesterday and we're going to continue building this thing, continue the discussion with other workers, other associates. and, you know, again, we keep asking the company to just come to the table and talk with us about problems. and if they continue to avoid talking to us, dismissing their employees, dismissing those w whose fa
invasion under the common law -- >> it isn't the sniffing in the abstract, it's the sniffing at this point. the sniffing at a person's front door, right? >> well, i mean, that's true, your honor, but i think if it wasn't a search for the police officer to walk up there and sniff and report smelling live marijuana, then it wasn't a search when frankie walked up there and alerted to the presence of an illegal narcotic. >> well, i didn't say it wouldn't be a search if the police officer himself did that if he went there with the intention of smelling at the door. he's going there to search, and he shouldn't be on the -- [inaudible] to search. >> i think it's been conceded in this case, at least it was below, that the officer could walk up there, report the smell of marijuana and that that was not a search. >> mr. garre, this is what we said, and i'm just going to read it. we said: we think that obtaining by sense-enhancing technology any information regarding the interior of the home that could not otherwise have been obtained without physical intrusion into a constitutionally-protected area
four days ago with a order basically says any decrease he issues are positive the law, not subject to being evoked by egyptian courts. he is meeting with chief justices in cairo looking for some sort of compromise solution, perhaps limiting that decree but the big question whether any limits or talk of compromise will be enough for people that have come out on the streets. in the past four days we've street violence not only here in cairo but across edwimt. at least 400 people woungeded at least one killed. offices of the muslim brotherhood have been ransacked or set on fire. those who support the president and those who oppose him are planning major street demonstrations tomorrow. without any compromise we could see more street violence in the next 24 hours. megyn, back to you. megyn: steve harrigan, thank you. keep us updated. well the move by morsi came immediate after president obama publicly praised morsi for his role in brokering the truce between israel and hamas militants. so what is this guy morsery really up to? he goes in. sweeps into hamas. he will be the savior. will h
's effectively trying to unionize wal-mart's work force without following the laws that stipulate late after 30 days of protests, the union must petition the labor relations board for election, on whether to form a union. unfair labor is working full-time and living in poverty, responded our wal-mart member, harris, texas, unfair labor is seeing your health care premiums skyrocket year after year, denied the hours needed to support your family. wal-mart knows what unfair labor is because we endure it every day. >> and what your laborers were and what you receive. if the employer feels you're worth more and they will he' get more. for a lot of people complaining about the working conditions, they're perfectly free to go out and find another job or start a company of their own, that's how the free market works and should work. >> an investigators from the national labor relations board, across the country deposing witnesses and focusing on documents and what constitutes picketing and the precise nature between the uscw union and our wal-mart. the national labor relations board is comprised of fou
, i cannot give that to you. because actually, by law, by law, the secret service have to protect the president, first lady, and the family. and in our day -- daddy was vice president, and that is when they changed the law. imagine what it would have been like if they had not changed the law. at that time, it was just the president. and the law was changed to include the vice president. imagine what it would have been like in dallas. but lucy did not get her day free from the secret service. >> she could get almost anything but not that. you had many unique experiences. i believe the only prom held in the white house and one of the very few weddings. >> it was very exciting. as a matter of fact, the previous big wedding was alice longworth. princess alice, they called her. in our day, she was the cat's meow in washington. she said -- she had a pillow that said "if you do not have anything nice to say to anybody, come and sit next to me." [laughter] she was wonderful to listen to as long as she wasn't saying anything bad about you. but she came to our wedding. i mean, she was fasci
as the president's orders stand, basically putting anything he says, any decree he makes, above the law and not subject to the court and we could have a country where prosecution basically shuts down. as far as the protesters in cairo, they've set up tents on tahrir down from yesterday, 40,000, yesterday afternoon and it turned violent and other cities, xaalexandria and police cars set on fire and other fires set as well. the next move in the battle will shape up to be tuesday when supporters of the president plan a march and also protesters, people who feel this president is trying to set himself up as a dictator will march as well. it will be a test of which side can draw the crowds and people and which side as a momentum in a battle so far, neither side is backing down heather. >> now, some background on president morsi's rise to power. he was elected on june 24th, 2012 with a strong mandate, winning more than 51% of the vote. and as a leader of the muslim brotherhood, he was the first islamist elected to be the head of an arab state. from the outset, morsi has been plagued with accu
mohammed morsi announced far-reaching powers placing himself above any government law. that has sparked the violent clashes that he see here on the streets and dozens of protests but the country's justice minister now saying there is some sort of resolution on all of this imminent. steve harrigan joins us now streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt. what happens if they fail to reach any kind of compromise here? >> reporter: well for the past four days
a law that would prevent a tax hike on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. gerri: there's the president calling out congress. what do you have to say, congressman? >> yeah, here we go in the middle of this. the house passed all our tax things in april. we passed the sequestering documents in may. we waited for the senate since may to reciprocate on that. the senate and white house sat on it, and they said we'll see you in the lame duck period. now it's lame duck, and now they want to get started when we finished or work in may on it. it's been frustrating in the process. it's the same song, 38th verse on it, waiting for the senate to get it going. now we're actually going, and the president now says you can clear the table on this. the reality is this is not a tax issue. it never has been a tax issue. we have the same amount of revenue coming in in 2012 that we had in 2007, but we spend a trillion dollars more per year now than we did five years ago. this is a spending issue. gerri: spending or revenue, that is, the amount of money taken in by the federal government has
they are on camera. >> biggest difference is is that is their house. there are still eavesdropping laws that apply to that when you are in a public place if you have visible cameras and a sign that says you are on video surveillance you have to say it's in the eye of the mannequin. >> the mannequin is not visible. you think you are just looking at a mannequin not an eye. >> she is looking at me and staring at me. >> stick around much more on legal debate. we will twin other topics this morning. a teen sentenced to church instead of going to jail for accidentally killing someone in his car. the aclu says it's unconstitutional. does the punishment fit the crime? with verizon. hurry in this saturday and sunday for great deals. likehe lucid by lg, free. or the galaxy nexus by samsung, free. this weekend, get the best deals on the best devices on the best network. exclusively at verizon. it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities
in the cincinnati enquirer, his hometown newspaper, the president's health care law adds a massive, expensive, unworkable government program at a time when our national debt already exceeds the size of our country's entire economy. we can't afford it and we can't afford to leave it intact. so try as they might, remember the last congress republicans passed a lot of bills out of the house of representatives that tore apart obama care. as even the president calls it now. they didn't go anywhere in the senate and meanwhile, alex, after the thanksgiving break, the principles are expected to get back together to begin negotiating in earnest. as you're right the clock is ticking. just a little bit more than one month to go before the nation heads over that fiscal cliff. al alex? >> 38 days and counting. thanks so much. let's go from the white house to the middle east now. palestinians and israelis are keeping a cease-fire alive. but many call the truce extremely fragile. an attempted border breach threatened the calm yesterday. israeli forces shot and killed a palestinian man. he was one of hundred
. >> i think you have to talk about whether it's by law or by culture. and i think most evebody would have understood early on that by law, the nation was secular, but by choice, the nation was -- in other words, its people were christians and there's always been that dynamic, people have always understood there's a tension there between a population that's largely christian but uses its freedom to choose christiity and the laws that say go ahead ande whatever religion you want to be. >> this is what i understand from your text. one of five of the founding fathers had any religious stressed denomination or affiliation and that was when it existed calvinist and that was pretty much of a god almost independent of jesus, correct, a watch maker god who starts the earth and then he leaves it on its own, a deistic god? >> well, no, in terms of the population there's the calvinists and the deists. >> way back then? >> right. the calvinists totally predominated among the population. the founding fathers were much more elites and yes, many of them were deists but in terms of the vast majority
of discrimination must get approval for any new voting laws. nine southern states plus counties in new york, and michigan fall under its jurisdiction. in the case, shelby county v. holder, one alabama county is challenging the law saying it unfairly targets their state. six other signed on. joining me now to discuss is julian bond, the former chairman of the naacp and instrumental in helping get that law passed. it is my absolutely pleasure to welcome you inside the war room. >> my great pleasure to be here. thank you. >> it has to be surreal to you just sitting here listening to a conversation almost 50 years hence about the voting rights act, that in fact people are trying to strip part of the voting rights act. how does that make you feel sitting here? >> a little more than sad, such a great struggle to win the voting rights act. it was thought to be the crown jewel of the civil rights movement, the one piece of legislation we could not have done without done enormous good and faces the prospect of being tossed out. it's terrible. >> what has to happen here? we talk about, you know, the
new life into a challenge to the health care law. the latest on that coming up. [ male announcer ] when was the last time something made your jaw drop? campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. now is a good time to think about your options. are you looking for a plan that really meets your needs and your budget? as you probably know, medicare only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they cover some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you in out-of-pocket medical costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand medicare and which aarp medicare supplement plan works best for you. with this type of plan, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients... plus, there are no network
, the state's former republican chairman greer claims they passed a law that was designed to squelch turnout and give the election to mitt romney. it made it harder for voters who moved to actually cast ballots. the republican party of florida has responded and tell "outfront," i want to quote them here, jim greer's quotes are false and details keep changing. great to have both of you. roland, let me start with you. these accusations come from jim greer, former boss of the party. he is accused of stealing money from the party. accusations come from charlie crist who abandoned the party to run as an independent. all that context is important. are these claims credible, though? >> for two years i've been blasting these efforts in florida as outright voter suppression and it is no shock to me that you're actually hearing this. it goes beyond just shortening early voting days. remember, they got rid of voting on sunday. now, in a country where you want more people voting, why would you take away a day when people would say, hey, no need to go to the polls tuesday, i can actually vote on that par
to them should the modifications be declined. some of these laws on the books a little archaic, and i will give you an example. we now have live entertainment in san francisco, which allows amplified music until 10:00 p.m. if the conditions has no entertainment, and the entertainment, it also includes this limited live provision. we have determined in the city that this legislation is good -- good legislation. there's no conditional use requirement to have this. a lot of people today want to have food, drink, and be able to have some music. how can we get the limited live entertainment excluded from the know amplified or no live entertainment excluded on the transfers? >> that is going to mostly driven locally. most of the conditions you'll ever see on an abc license are because we rely, to a great extent, on the police department and local officials to determine what is best for their communities. i'm not trying to pin this on you guys or blame you guys, but we do try to work with you. we do not tend to want to overrule the police department very often. now that said, i get a fair nu
decisions effectively above the law. he said he was doing that to protect egypt's very slow move towards democracy from the judges and prosecutors mostly hand picked by hosni mubarak who were seen as sabotaging the process. the backlash was huge, was immediate, the past four days with national strikes, a sit-in on tahrir square and on going clashes between pro morsi and anti--morsi camps and the riot police. so far neither side has backed down. the pressures are growing. egypt's stock market, after losing $5 billion yesterday, has dropped another 5% today. all eyes now are on this meeting between top judges and morsi who it's hoped we'll find some kind of face-saving end to a crisis splitting egypt apart just when it should be sitting down, unified, and working on things like a new constitution. lynn, if there's any reminder of how all this might play out, there's a funeral later today in cairo for the first fatality, a teenage protester shot and killed in a street battle. >> jim maceda in egypt. thanks so much. >>> a tense but much calmer scene along the israeli-gaza border this morning
to maintain law and order. we've seen clashes erupt, many of them towards the freedom of justice party. that is the political wing of the muslim brotherhood from which president mohamed morsi comes from. we're talking about the decree that he issued on thursday that gave him sweeping powers to make new laws without judicial reviews, that has angered many and what has galvanized the protesters to come back to tahrir square. egyptian judges are calling for a strike. there's no indication morsi will rescind his decision. he said he will narrowly use his new powers to ally some of their fears by opposition and other human rights organizations. >> thanks so much. >>> well, back here at home, new york governor andrew cuomo called superstorm sandy more impactful than hurricane katrina and now both new york and new jersey are asking for a combined total of more than $71 billion in federal aid. well, in new york the money would not only pay for cleanup and recovery, it would also be used to try and limit damage from future storms. new jersey, which saw heavy damage to its transit system and sho
expression. ( drumbeats ) taxation without representation: copley's father-in-law, an english merchant, was importing tea to america. copley felt he could not speak out against his family, nor could he defend them. seeking his artistic heritage, he sailed for europe. it wasn't long before he became part of that heritage, a forerunner in the great romantic movement. still, the longer his self-imposed exile in england, the greater his loneliness. his children were his models. the commissions continued. but his greatest masterpieces were painted while memory and imagination were fresh. ( drumbeats, lively trumpet notes ) in his isolation in england, copley worked harder to be america's first great painter. "poor america," he wrote, "yet certain i am she will finally emerge from her present calamity and become a mighty empire. and it is a pleasing reflection that i shall stand amongst the first of the artists that shall have led the country to the knowledge and cultivation of the fine arts." narrator: ...yet george catlin had a grander dream: he was an artist in search of a cause. ( native
above the law. and how will the u.s. handle this? >>> plus, the chances of winning are ridiculously low. but millions of us are still lining up for a shot at a record powerball jackpot. >> lucky, lucky, lotto win. >> shepard: tonight a look at the actual odds of winning it all. but first from fox this tuesday night, three republican senators now say they cannot support the u.n. ambassador, susan rice, for secretary of state. at least until they get more answers about her comments about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. president obama has not yet even nominated her. but the white house says she is enormously qualified. senators john mccain, lindsey graham and kelly ayotte say they're even more troubled now after meeting with ambassador rice. the attack on libya on september 11 killed the u.s. ambassador, cries stevens and three other americans. five days later, ambassador rice went on the sunday talk shows and said u.s. officials believed it was a spontaneous reaction to protest over an anti-islam video. not a preplanned terrorist attack. first the controversy was over wheth
take to keep this damage from happening again. >> brown: ray suarez updates the health care reform law, as the obama administration issues new rules governing what insurers must cover. >> woodruff: and we close under the bright lights of high school football, where a trail-blazing coach puts her players' studies ahead of practice. >> you won't be playing football. we like to think we have a lot of life to live so you will too and you need to prepare for that. football is kind of just icing on the >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: this was a day of urgent diplomacy aimed at stopping the battle of air strikes and roc
with the president's healthcare law. it's going to take effect. doctor siegel will tell us what it means for you and for people everywhere. ainsley: one city is no longer allowing nativity scenes at a park. you can't argue with nutrition you can see. great grains. great grains cereal starts whole and stays whole. see the seam? more pcessed flakes look nothing like natural grains. i'm eating what i kn is better nutrition. mmmm. great grains. search great grains and see for yourself. and with my bankamericard cash rewards credit card, i love 'em even more. i earn 1%h back everywhere, ry time. 2% on groceries. i earn 3% ogas. everywhere, rautomatically. no hoops to jump through. that's 1% back on... [ toy robot sounds ] 2% on pumpkin pie. and apple. 3% back on 4 trips to the airport. it's as easy as... -[ man ] 1... -[ woman ] 2... [ woman ] 3. [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. gregg: our troops overseas celebrating thanksgiving in afghanistan r-r after feasting on a traditional meal the troops still up for a game of rugby. >> the
miscarried. she was denied an abortion because of ireland's strict abortion laws. now her husband's speaking out to cnn's nic robertson. >> reporter: he has lost his wife and now fears the truth behind her tragic death may be lost too. >> some key information is missing. >> reporter: they met in india, married then set up home in ireland four years ago. he is an engineer. she was a dentist. they were happy here. >> she loved dancing. she forced me to dance with her a couple of times on the stage. we gave a performance. never have i gone on stage or i never had. i always had stage fear to go to speak out and the belief she gave me. it was unbelievable. >> reporter: together they had dreams of a beautiful future, of children, their children, of having a family. >> she was looking forward basically. in a way she found that she is at the right place. that's the reason why. she knew and she was very well organized as well. she knew what she wanted in life. so that's the reason why she had decided to settle here on the long-term. >> reporter: when she became pregnant, they were overjoyed. then the
or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his
of next year that is built into the current law, the so-called fiscal clef. the automatic tax increases and spending cuts that make up the fiscal cliff absent of offsetting changes proposes a substantial threat to the recovery. indeed by the reckoning of the congressional budget office, the cbo, and that of many outside observers, a fiscal shock of that size would send the economy toppling back into the recession. second, early in the new year it will be necessary to improve and increase in the federal and debt limit to avoid any possibility of a catastrophic default on the nation's treasury securities and other obligations. as you recall the threat of default in the summer of 2011 fueled the economic uncertainty even though an agreement was ultimately reached. the failure to reach an agreement this time around can impose an even heavier economic and financial cost. as the fiscal policy makers face these decisions with the two objectives in mind, first as i think it is widely appreciated by now, the federal budget is on an unsustainable path. the budget deficit which peaked at about 10%
residents in every state to secede from the united states. a georgetown university law professor is our guest. "washington journal" is next. host: federal officials including lawmakers on capitol hill are looking at how to slash wait times and possibly boost early voting. that will be hours subject for the first section of this edition of "the washington journal." for the first 45 minutes we will be talking to you about remedies to speed up the voting process. the numbers are on the screen. you can reach out to us by social media. @cspanwj. the conversation constantly going on on facebook -- facebook.com/cspan. we begin this morning with a look at the lead story in "the baltimore sun." pushed to speed of voting processes is the headline. he writes -- we want to find out from you, our viewers and listeners, your thoughts and remedies on speeding up the voting process. more from the article in "the baltimore sun." the article goes on to talk about a bill being proposed by virginia by senator mark warner. it says -- we would like to show you a little bit more about what the presiden
constitutional law. host: does fighting cyber crime violate the law? caller: the bill that is actually being passed to create cyber police or cyber security -- this deal that created violates the constitutional laws. host: we have a couple of bills on the table, but we also seeing the white house. we mentioned that the president has asked for the military to act more aggressively. guest: obviously, i do not have all of the details on this particular bill because it is classified. however, i can tell you, have spent nine years until the military. i have been a part of a lot of operations. in every case, the legal opinion was always an issue that was never passed over to ensure that not just u.s. citizens' rights were in storage but also the rights of the international. i cannot comment on the bill. i have not seen it. i can tell the historically i have never come across a situation where the law was something that was ignored. host: the reason you have not seen it is because it is a secret directive that this point. "the washington post" goes on to say -- give us a sense of how the government
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